Writings by author Paul D. Dail

Paul D. Dail

Paul D. Dail is the author of The Imaginings, a supernatural/horror novel, as well as numerous other short stories. His collection of flash fiction, Free Five, has spent over a year in the top 50 Kindle Horror Shorts Stories since it’s publication in 2012.  He also has a piece appearing in the upcoming anthology No Place Like Home from Angelic Knight Press, where he will appear in the company of veteran Bram Stoker Award winners.

Writing has always been his passion, and while he will quickly tell you that the people he has met in the many places that he has traveled have been the best schooling he could get, Paul received his formal education in English with a Creative Writing emphasis at the University of Montana, Missoula.

Currently Paul lives with his wife and children in southern Utah, amid the red rock, sagebrush, and pinion junipers.  He teaches Language Arts and Creative Writing at Tuacahn High School for the Performing Arts.
 

Follow Paul on his blog

To learn more about Paul D. Dail beyond the brief bio below, or just to hear his rants and raves (and reviews of current and classic literature), please visit his blog at:

www.pauldail.com -A horror writer's not necessarily horrific blog

 

most recently from the blogosphere...

What Makes a Good Bad Guy? Part 2

What’s news for horror writer Paul D. Dail?

Not much since last week (maybe this is why I don’t post more frequently :) )

I submitted a short story to another market I'm excited about. Deadline is end of March. Send out those good thoughts for me.

And finally got started on edits for my next novel.  It’s slow going, but I’m optimistic.

But now, without further ado…

What Makes a Good Bad Guy? Part 2: Turning the “Shadow” into flesh and blood

Image from Flickr Creative CommonsIn Part One of this article, I discussed the theory that one possible reason so many writers (and readers/viewers, for that matter) enjoy the character of the “bad guy” is because he/she/it represents what Swiss psychologist Carl Jung called the Shadow archetype, our opposite side of the Self we project to others.

However, while the Shadow may be the opposite of the Self, it is not completely alien. A well-crafted villain has to have something to which we can relate. They can’t be the nefarious, mustache-twisting man in black who does evil (read: eee-vul) just for the sake of evil. Well, they can be that villain, but then there’s less internal conflict in the minds of your readers. If you can create a “bad guy” that people actually like, they’re going to have a harder time doing the easy thing: cheering for the hero.

click here to continue reading at www.pauldail.com